IV. Largo Maestoso

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III - Including Intermezzo - 1. Introduzione Maestoso ed Adagio. III - Including Intermezzo - 2. Sonata I Largo. III - Including Intermezzo - 3. Sonata II Grave e Cantabile. III - Including Intermezzo - 4. Sonata III Grave. The third movement is based on a hymn tune called "From Greenland's Icy Mountains.

I have only recently had the chance to perform this piece with a truly subterranean percussion ensemble in San Francisco. It makes a tremendous difference. It is so remarkable that this man imagined these things and knew exactly what he was talking about. When you read the instructions in the score which say a "subterranean percussion ensemble," it sounds totally absurd. But if you actually do it, set it up so they can play in a space that would normally be given over to the pit beneath the stage, it sounds fantastic.

So this ensemble begins playing this odd, rhythmic pattern which suggests the ticking of the universal clock. The theme is the same, the question of human existence. And this time the answer is a sort of procession, a mournful procession, the tune of which is one of Ives' most masterful combinations of several phrases from several different sources, melded together.

It is an expressive and sad melody. And what an ensemble it is--the violins of the Star of Bethlehem group play along with one solo violin on stage and gradually more violins join in. The large forces of the orchestra--brass, winds, and percussion--come in, bringing various phrases to a glittering, obliterating climax, and then they disappear-one of Ives' favorite effects.

This huge sound suddenly clears, and leaves the sound of the violin and quarter tone pianos far off in the distance playing a beautiful quarter tone harmonization of "Nearer, My God, to Thee. It's these kinds of contrasts which shape the movement, leading to the biggest of climaxes where "Nearer, My God, to Thee" in the massed low brass is pitted against the swirling original combination hymn tune in the upper orchestra. The Fourth Symphony c. His father was the youngest bandmaster in the Union Army during the American Civil War and encouraged his son to make music.

Young Ives also excelled at baseball and American football. He received a solid grounding in harmony and counterpoint from his composition professor at Yale University, and ran experiments in mixing different types of music with the Hyperion Theater Orchestra.

Ives made his living in the insurance business and composed in his spare time, a practical arrangement that delivered great creative freedom. This staunchly independent thinker synthesized the American folk tunes and hymns of his childhood with his own aesthetic, using techniques such as bitonality and polyrhythms decades before they entered the standard 20th-century composition toolbox to create a unique sound and a personal voice — truly, an American original.

Tchaikovsky: The Nutcracker, Op. A quiet passage follows. Unlike the bold beginning, the movement dies away, quadruple-pianissimo, at the end. It is an orchestral expansion—not merely a simple orchestration—of Ives's piano solo, The Celestial Railroad ca. As such, the "Comedy" movement is a composition of the s, and may represent one of Ives's last orchestral endeavors. It is his most extreme essay in overlapping thematic material, found also in his Holidays Symphony , but is most complex in its use of multimetrics and temporal dysynchronies, and is compositionally his most complex orchestral work.

The disjunctive metrical and temporal complexity of this movement requires at least one additional conductor. The music builds to several riotous climaxes before ebbing away. An arrangement of this movement by future film composer Bernard Herrmann notable for his scores to Alfred Hitchcock 's films was performed in New York on May 10, , but Ives's version was not performed until the integral premiere of the entire Symphony in It is a mild orchestral expansion compared with the extreme expansion of the Comedy movement from its piano solo source of a student fugue exercise Ives composed during his years at Yale University ; in its orchestral form, it ends with a brief quotation of " Joy to the World ".

According to Elliott Carter , the movement "is about seventy-five percent the same as the first movement of [Ives'] First String Quartet " and "has a few irregular bar lengths, polyrhythms, and dissonances added especially at the expanded climax near the end.

Paradoxically, because of its juxtaposition with the other three harmonically, tonally and rhythmically complex movements, Ives biographer Jan Swafford calls this most outwardly simple and conservative movement "in a way the most revolutionary movement of all". The symphony ends with what Ives called "an apotheosis of the preceding content, in terms that have something to do with the reality of existence and its religious experience".

The first performance of the Finale to the symphony was part of the integral premiere of the Symphony on April 26, , by the American Symphony Orchestra under Leopold Stokowski , some 11 years after Ives's death.

In his Memos , Ives wrote that the movement "seems to me the best, compared with the other movements, or for that matter with any other thing that I've done. In Henry Bellamann 's program note to the premiere of the first and second movements of the symphony a program note that seems to be ghost-written by Ives, as his tone of voice and use of language is obvious throughout , the program of the symphony is described this way:.

Why not buy the whole Album? Your selections total more than the whole disc price. Please login to post a review. Fine performances all; collectors of this series need not hesitate. About Chandos About Us Chandos Records is one of the world's premier classical music record companies, best known for its ground breaking search for neglected musical gems.

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May 11,  · Largo maestoso. 2 PREVIEW Triumphal Symphony in E Major, Op. 6: III. Scherzo. Allegro vivo. 3 PREVIEW Triumphal Symphony in E Major, Op. 6: IV.

8 thoughts on “IV. Largo Maestoso”

  1. Aug 28,  · IV. Finale. Very slowly - Largo maestoso. Los Angeles Philharmonic, Gustavo Dudamel, Los Angeles Master Chorale & Marta Gardolińska.
  2. IV. Largo Maestoso: Credits Art Direction – J. J. Stelmach; Choir – The John Alldis Choir* Composed By – Charles Ives; Conductor – José Serebrier* Design [Cover Construction].
  3. Aug 31,  · Symphony No. 1 in G Major: IV. Largo maestoso - Poco piu andante - Allegro, a song by Nino Rota, Norrköping Symphony Orchestra, Ole Kristian Ruud on Spotify We and our partners use cookies to personalize your experience, to show you ads based on your interests, and for measurement and analytics esilloztiotory.snarenterabricowonhostcharnaconle.co Duration: 8 min.
  4. Fugue: Andante Moderato B2 IV. Largo Maestoso Credits Art Direction – J. J. Stelmach Choir – The John Alldis Choir* Composed By – Charles Ives Conductor – José Serebrier* Design [Cover Construction] – Olive Alpert, Ralph Keefe Engineer [Mastering Engineer] – Paul Goodman Engineer [Recording Engineer] – Robert Auger Seller Rating: % positive.
  5. iv. Finale: Very slowly – Largo maestoso [ edit ] The symphony ends with what Ives called "an apotheosis of the preceding content, in terms that have something to do with the reality of existence and its religious experience". [2].
  6. Aug 28,  · Symphony No. 4: IV. Finale. Very slowly - Largo maestoso () Charles Ives – Complete Symphonies offers fresh insights into the music of a radical thinker, creator of what Leonard Bernstein called “his own private musical revolution.” The Los Angeles Philharmonic’s performances of these works at Walt Disney Concert Hall, conducted by.
  7. Charles Ives: Complete Symphonies. DG: Buy download online. Marta Gardolińska (chorus conductor) Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra, Los Angeles Master Chorale, Gustavo Dudamel.
  8. 16 Charles Edward Ives: Symphony No. 4: IV. Finale. Very slowly - Largo maestoso ; Total Runtime ; Info for Charles Ives: Complete Symphonies. Charles Ives – Complete Symphonies offers fresh insights into the music of a radical thinker, creator of what Leonard Bernstein called “his own private musical revolution.” The Los.

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